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Dive Into the New Age of Sustainable, Emission-Free Localised Hydro-Electric Power and New Revenue Streams.

PowerdΩ® Cercarbono Credits Industry Sector Case Studies
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PowerdΩ® Hydro-Electric Power Transformation Solution - Industry Examples-
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One 160mm diameter PowerdΩ® Hydro-Electric Power Transformation Solution can produce approximately 40,000 kWh of electricity in a single day and can produce approximately 14,600,000 kWh of electricity in 12 months.

The value of avoiding fourteen million six hundred thousand kilowatt-hours (14,600,000 kWh) of carbon dioxide CO2 is approximately three billion seven hundred eighty-four million eight hundred ninety-six thousand pounds (£3,784,896,000) on the Carbon Credit Market.
 
As of 16/03/23, the current rate is £252.38 per ton of carbon dioxide emissions. Therefore, for every ton of carbon dioxide emissions that are avoided, the carbon credits are worth £252.38. This is from a benchmark price as of 16/03/23 is £0.86 to €1, meaning that €100 ($106.59) is equal to £86.59.

The breakdown of the per tonne price of £252.38 with a benchmark price of €100 ($106.59) would be £200.50 for the benchmark price, and £51.88 for the fees, transaction costs, and other charges associated with the purchase of the credits.

This could have a significant effect on PowerdΩ® Solutions, as the company’s products and services are focused on reducing the dependence on batteries and providing an ecological and sustainable solution.

Buyers of carbon credits may end up paying more than the benchmark price in markets.
 
This is because the benchmark price does not include the cost of brokerage fees, transaction costs, and other costs associated with buying and selling carbon credits.

In addition, carbon credits may be sold at a premium above the benchmark price depending on the seller's circumstances and the availability of the credits.

Energy Use in the UK Water Treatment Industry - PowerdΩ® Hydro-Electric Power Transformati
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Generally, it is estimated that the total energy consumption of the UK water treatment industry is around 3,000 GWh per year, with an estimated cost of around £1 billion per year.

The energy consumption and cost of water treatment in the UK varies greatly depending on the size and type of water treatment facility.

The UK government estimates that the average annual energy consumption of a small water treatment plant is around 200,000 kWh, with an estimated annual cost of around £35,000.

For a larger plant, the annual energy consumption is estimated at around 1,000,000 kWh and the cost is estimated at between £70,000 and £150,000.

Sources: This information is sourced from the UK government's Water UK website. https://www.discoverwater.co.uk/

To transform 3,000 GWh per year would require 750 PowerdΩ® Hydro-Electric Power Transformation Solutions. The value of avoiding three billion kilowatt-hours (3,000,000,000 kWh) of carbon dioxide CO2 is approximately seven hundred fifty-seven billion five hundred twenty-eight million four hundred thousand pounds (£757,528,400,000) on the Carbon Credit Market. 
 

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Energy Use in the UK Cement Industry - PowerdΩ® Hydro-Electric Power Transformation Soluti
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If 0.25% of the total energy cost of the UK cement industry, which is 700 GWh per year, is transformed by PowerdΩ® Hydro-Electric Power Transformation Solutions, then it will require 25 of these solutions to generate 175,000 kWh of electricity in a 12-month period.

 

The value of avoiding 175,000 kWh of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions would be approximately £4,144,400 on the Carbon Credit Market.

 

In total, this would equate to approximately 1,500,000 kWh of electricity produced per day, with a total value of avoided carbon dioxide emissions on the Carbon Credit Market of approximately £36,125,440.

 

If 100% of the 700 GWh per year is transformed by PowerdΩ® Hydro-Electric Power Transformation Solutions, then it will require 175 of these solutions to generate 4,250,000 kWh of electricity in a 12-month period.

 

The value of avoiding 4,250,000 kWh of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions would be approximately £109,444,000 on the Carbon Credit Market.

 

In total, this would equate to approximately 11,500,000 kWh of electricity produced per day, with a total value of avoided carbon dioxide emissions on the Carbon Credit Market of approximately £145,125,440.

 

This information is sourced from the UK Energy Research Centre's report on 'Energy Use in the UK Cement Industry. 

 

https://ukerc.ac.uk/publications/energy-use-in-the-uk-cement-industry


 

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A PowerdΩ® and TUSQ® Aggregate Modification Solution to - The Challenge of Maintaining UK
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The Challenge of Maintaining UK Roads – Introduction:

Source: https://www.newcivilengineer.com/latest/funding-shortfall-for-local-road-maintenance-highest-for-28-years-says-asphalt-industry-alliance-21-03-2023/

The 2021 announcement saw the Department for Transport (DfT) allocate £500M a year to local authorities outside of London to tackle up to 10M potholes.

The £2.7bn Potholes Fund aimed to provide local highways maintenance funding between tax years 2022 and 2025 to local authorities outside of London and the eight largest city regions.

According to Green, a pothole is being filled once every 22 seconds somewhere on the local roads network.
"We have spent in excess of £10bn in the last decade filling pots," he said.

“By the way potholes are not inevitable. People think with a pothole you've got to fix it. Actually, potholes are really only a symptom of a poorly maintained network in the first place.

“You could do away with potholes altogether with proper, preventative maintenance but it costs money.
Tough decisions have got to be made as to where to spend the money.”

Further to AIA’s report, it was discovered 18% of the local roads network, constituting almost 60km, is assessed as having less than five years’ structural life remaining.

The AA head of roads policy Jack Cousens said: “The condition of some of our roads is an international embarrassment and it needs a concerted effort and investment to halt the decline.

“Half of councils have already cut back spending on road maintenance. Astonishingly, it now takes more than 100 years to fully resurface the streets and the cash needed to salvage the infrastructure has spiralled to the extreme. National and local politicians have failed to look after their biggest and most important asset for years.

“Years of sticking plaster solutions haven’t solved the problem, so it’s now time for serious investment and serious action.”
 
Annual Local Authority Road Maintenance (ALARM) Survey:

2023 Survey reports no respite for local roads.

Every year the Asphalt Industry Alliance (AIA) commissions an independent survey of local authority highway departments in England (including London) and Wales.

The Annual Local Authority Road Maintenance (ALARM) survey – now in its 28th year – provides detailed insight into the funding and conditions of the local road network, based on information provided directly by those responsible for its maintenance.

This year it received a record number of responses from 75% of local authorities in England and Wales, providing robust findings which are used by stakeholders across the sector for tracking, benchmarking and planning purposes.

ALARM 2023 reports that local authority highway teams in England and Wales only received around two-thirds of what they needed to stop our local roads from further deterioration and that more than £14 billion – £68,000 for every mile of local road – is now needed to fix the backlog of carriageway repairs.

Download the full 2023 report.
https://www.asphaltuk.org/alarm-survey-page/

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Advantages of Unmodified Bitumen with TUSQ® Aggregate Modification-
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The carbon footprint implications of PMB are associated with the additional energy required for its production, processing, transportation, and storage compared to unmodified bitumen.

Note: The typical processing and storage temperatures for PMB are between 180°C and 220°C, while for penetration grade (unmodified bitumen) the temperature range is between 160°C and 190°C.

According to a study by the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change published in 2019, the carbon footprint of PMB is typically 10-20% higher than that of unmodified bitumen.

Note: Specifically, page 4 of the report in the "Key findings" section it states: "PMB has a higher carbon footprint than unmodified bitumen, typically 10-20% higher."

The price of PMB is typically higher than that of unmodified bitumen, due to the additional energy required for its production, processing, transportation, and storage.

The exact difference in price will depend on the specific market and the supplier however, generally speaking, PMB is typically 20-30% more expensive, than unmodified bitumen.

Considering the disadvantages of using polymer modified bitumen (PMB), it is beneficial to use unmodified bitumen with aggregate modified with TUSQ®.
 
Note: TUSQ® is a patent pending polymerised glass ceramic which modifies the aggregate matrix from within the asphalt mixing process, rather than separately modifying the bitumen as is the typical practice.
 
TUSQ® has shown that it enables all the current advantages of polymer modified bitumen (PMB) without the high cost of storage associated with polymer modified bitumen (PMB).

Aggregate modified with TUSQ® offers a similar performance to PMB, but without the additional energy requirements associated with its production, processing, transportation and storage.

Using unmodified bitumen, with aggregate modified with TUSQ®, will reduce the carbon footprint and price associated with PMB, while providing similar and proven likely, significantly improved surface integrity and longevity performance.

Results of official comparative testing with a control Stone mastic asphalt (SMA) 2010 mix and with a hot rolled asphalt (HRA) mix.

In both cases with the optimum bitumen content with TUSQ®, showed that with TUSQ® aggregate modified asphalt mixes, there is better performance with less bitumen over the control sample mixes.

In relation to Stone Mastic Asphalt (SMA) 2010 mix comparative certified testing.

There is a 60.3% advantage difference in “Mean Corrected Stability” performance between the TUSQ® modified SMA mix sample and the control SMA mix sample without TUSQ®.

An advantage difference of 102% in “Mean Flow” performance between the TUSQ® modified SMA mix sample and the control sample without TUSQ®.

Mean Tangential Flow is very similar to the control sample which shows good workability of the asphalt mix even with the addition of TUSQ® to the aggregate.

The higher TUSQ® sample “Marshall Quotient” figure 80% difference over the control SMA mix sample is typically a good thing in asphalt. Higher Marshall Quotient figures indicate that the asphalt has better workability and durability.

To get close to the performance of the TUSQ® modified SMA asphalt samples, the control mix had to have 6.2 % bitumen and was still under the performance of the TUSQ® SMA samples with 5.7% bitumen.

This is a 17.54% increase in bitumen requirement with still a 7.8% difference in “Mean Corrected Stability” performance behind the TUSQ® modified samples and a 19.6% advantage difference in “Marshall Quotient” performance over the control sample which had 6.2% bitumen.

In relation to Hot Rolled Asphalt (HRA) mix comparative certified testing.

TUSQ® was tested in an HRA mix where the optimum bitumen content was discovered to be 5%, provided a 24.2 % advantage difference in “Mean Corrected Stability” performance over the control sample without TUSQ®.

Also, in an HRA mix there was a 41% advantage difference in “Marshall Quotient” performance over the control sample with 6% bitumen content in the mix as opposed to 5% optimum in the TUSQ® modified samples.

The evidence suggests that unmodified bitumen with aggregate modified with TUSQ® produces better performance than a control mix with higher bitumen content.

This is reaffirmed by the higher Marshall Quotient figures, indicating that the TUSQ® modified aggregate asphalt has better workability and durability.

This evidence provides a viable high performance and ecologically improved practical road infrastructure solution, for reducing the carbon footprint associated with Polymer Modified Bitumen, PMB, while still providing superior road surface longevity performance.

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A Proposed Funding Solution-
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In Scotland the asphalt plant with one of the highest CO2 emissions and highest energy cost is located in the Highland Council area.

This Asphalt Plant has an energy cost of approximately £1,167,000 per year.

This Asphalt Plant uses approximately 3.1 GWh of energy per year.

One PowerdΩ® Hydro-Electric Power Transformation Solution can produce approximately 40,000 kWh of electricity in a single day and can produce approximately 14,600,000 kWh of electricity in 12 months.

The value of avoiding fourteen million six hundred thousand kilowatt-hours (14,600,000 kWh) of carbon dioxide CO2 is approximately three billion seven hundred eighty-four million eight hundred ninety-six thousand pounds (£3,784,896,000) on the Carbon Credit Market.

This is based on the current market rate of £252.38 per ton of carbon dioxide emissions.

As of 16/03/23, the current rate is £252.38 per ton of carbon dioxide emissions. Therefore, for every ton of carbon dioxide emissions that are avoided, the carbon credits are worth £252.38. This is from a benchmark price as of 16/03/23 is £0.86 to €1, meaning that €100 ($106.59) is equal to £86.59.

The breakdown of the per tonne price of £252.38 with a benchmark price of €100 ($106.59) would be £200.50 for the benchmark price, and £51.88 for the fees, transaction costs, and other charges associated with the purchase of the credits.

This could have a significant effect on PowerdΩ® Solutions, as the company’s products and services are focused on reducing the dependence on batteries and providing an ecological and sustainable solution.

The typical energy cost of an asphalt processing plant in the UK is approximately £1,000,000 per year.

This amount of energy is equivalent to approximately 3.2 GWh and is typically produced via carbon-emitting energy production methods such as natural gas, coal, and oil.

The source of this information can be found in the Asphalt Industry Alliance's (AIA) report on the energy cost of asphalt plants in the UK.
 
The Invergordon Asphalt Plant uses approximately 3.1 GWh of energy per year, which is higher than the total energy cost of all the asphalt plants in the UK, which is approximately £1,000,000 per year or 3.2 GWh of energy per year.

Note: Funding shortfall for local road maintenance highest for 28 years says Asphalt Industry Alliance
21 MAR, 2023 BY THOMAS JOHNSON

An annual survey report from the Asphalt Industry Alliance (AIA) has revealed the funding shortfall for local road repairs is the highest it’s been in 28 years at £1.3bn leading to roads in England and Wales being branded "a national embarrassment".

https://www.newcivilengineer.com/latest/funding-shortfall-for-local-road-maintenance-highest-for-28-years-says-asphalt-industry-alliance-21-03-2023/

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